Support INGYouth Muslim Teen Training

“Ali said she used to want to transfer to another, more diverse high school. But she felt differently after taking the INGYouth training and giving her presentations. ‘I felt more comfortable at my school, and I also think that the kids felt more comfortable with Muslims at school because we kind of understood each other a little bit better,’ Ali said.”
– KQED Public Radio Interview

INGYouth Speakers Presenting about Muslims and Islam at a church in the South Bay

This Year, ING Grew Muslim Teen Workshops by over 1500%

An INGYouth Speaker Presenting about Muslims and Islam in her classroom in the East Bay

This year, we focused on regions where Muslim students are challenged by bullying and harassment for their religious or ethnic identities. We conducted workshops for nearly 1,000 students in 2019, up from only 60 students last year. These workshops were held in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, and West Contra Costa, and in New Jersey, Michigan and Ohio through our affiliates.

In 2020: We plan to expand INGYouth to all Muslims students

An INGYouth Speaker Presenting about Muslims and Islam in a Buddhist temple in the South Bay

In 2020, we plan on continuing to expand the program to all Muslim students around the country who attend public and private schools. You can play a role as follows:
  • Register your children to an upcoming program through ING or one of its affiliates.
  • Talk with your mosque to hold a workshop. Costs include travel and accommodations
  • Support the program by donating online.
INGYouth workshops are designed to increase confidence in students’ Muslim identity, familiarize them with their rights when they are harassed because of their faith, help them answer questions that they are asked about Islam and Muslims, and train them to speak about Islam in the context of social studies content standards through the various tools we provide them.

INGYouth Muslim Teen Trainings Impact in Recent News

An INGYouth Speaker Presenting about Muslims and Islam in her classroom in the South Bay

 
“If students intervene to confront bullies, start a conversation to counter negative stereotypes, or nip hurtful language or jokes in the bud, that helps create a better environment for everyone at school, Pathan told the students.”
 
 
“Ali said she used to want to transfer to another, more diverse high school. But she felt differently after taking the training and giving her presentations. ‘I felt more comfortable at my school, and I also think that the kids felt more comfortable with Muslims at school because we kind of understood each other a little bit better,’ Ali said.”

We invite you to join us as we build on these accomplishments in the coming year. Please consider supporting us in any amount you feel comfortable giving at www.ing.org/donate. Thank you.

Maha Elgenaidi
ING Executive Director
Islamic Networks Group (ING) is a peace-building organization providing face-to-face education and engagement opportunities that foster understanding of Muslims and other misunderstood groups to promote harmony among all people.